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AIDS 2012 Global Village

Global Village overview

The Global Village is a diverse and vibrant space that promotes networking between communities from across the globe and provides a place for displays, discussions, debates and performances from various cultures. Through these rich and varied activities, communities demonstrate how the application of science and good leadership lead to improved outcomes for men, women and children living with or at risk for HIV around the world. Not only do individuals from attending organisations and conference delegates have the opportunity to experience and learn from this, the Global Village is also open to the general public, and admission is free.

"I mean you can just hear it. I think it’s this vibrant, dynamic space where community feels at home. They feel that this is their space. And so they bring with them everything that they care about, everything that they’re passionate about. And that means color, movement, and passion, and frustration. And we’re really happy to have the wide diversity and wide variety of those emotions and those feelings because we know that all of that makes such a difference in the community response to HIV. And the energy here is fantastic. They range from—you know, one corner of the Global Village will be having a party atmosphere with dancing, and singing, and music, and the other corner will have sessions with the panel discussion or debates. And in fact today we have a debate around how science and community cannot let go of the fact that condoms are really important. And that’s a debate that we’re having in the Global Village. And there are no other spaces in the entire conference where you can actually have what’s officially called a debate and we’re really, really proud of that."

- Joseph Elias, AIDS 2012 Global Village Coordinator

They bring with them everything that they care about, everything that they’re passionate about. And that means color, movement, and passion, and frustration. And we’re really happy to have the wide diversity and wide variety of those emotions and those feelings because we know that all of that makes such a difference in the community response to HIV.

Joseph Elias

Let me show you some of the AIDS 2012 Global Village activities:

  • More than 30 Global Village Sessions that feature panel discussions, debates and presentations with live Q&As.
  • Twenty-seven Networking Zones where local and international groups focused on particular populations or geographic regions meet, conduct activities, and engage with conference delegates and the public.

    This year we had our first Community and Science Networking Zone, which was spearheaded by International AIDS Society (IAS) leaders who wanted to ensure science and community had a designated space where they could connect and bridge their knowledge.  This year also saw our largest Women’s Networking Zone, Harm Reduction Networking Zone, and Human Rights Networking Zone, as well as a very large Latino Caribbean Diaspora Networking Zone.

    The Networking Zones are becoming focal points for people who are passionate, concerned and motivated to get involved in addressing issues around key affected populations.  For us, that’s a significant aspect of the Global Village at AIDS 2012.
  • The Main Stage where there are live musical, dance and theatrical performances addressing HIV in the context of treatment and care, human rights, gender, culture and other key issues.
  • A Screening Room for screening videos and documentaries about HIV and human rights.
  • Meeting Rooms for small informal discussions.
  • Our largest Youth Pavilion, the main networking space for young people, where they host meetings and forums, showcase the achievements of youth-led initiatives from around the world, and engage with other participants.
  • NGO and Marketplace Booths that showcase the impact of poverty reduction efforts on HIV care and prevention programmes, and offer NGOS an opportunity to sell their products to generate income.
  • Art Exhibits including sculpture, installations, photos and paintings about HIV and related issues as experienced and expressed at the grassroots level.
  • The Community Dialogue Space, where conference delegates and the general public engage with community-based and grassroots HIV organisations from around the world about some of the victories and challenges faced by communities on the frontlines.  The space also hosts high-level dialogue sessions between civil society and international leaders, press conferences and cultural events.

For more information download a brief description of the Positive Action Networking Zone panel discussions that took place during AIDS 2012.

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